project leader
John M
location
City-wide
(Glenville, Campus District, Ohio City, Old Brooklyn)
latest update rss
No updates yet.

the project

Instead of focusing on raising money, we are focused on building community by reaching out to area gardeners to donate Native Flowering Perennials. We are sourcing our list of requested plants primarily from the Pollinator Partnership's list for the Eastern Broadleaf Forest

We are interested in using any of the plants from this list, even if they are now dormant. 

Below is a list of flowering perennials native to North America that provide habitat for pollinators either through supplying a food source (nectar) or as hosts that provide food and shelter for larval development, AKA reproduction!  This list is not exhaustive.  It is sourced primarily from the Pollinator Partnership's guide for Continental Eastern Broadleaf Forest.  This list is sorted by Common Name. 

Here is a similar list with additional details including Scientific Names > 

If you are able to donate plants from our list, please send an email to John M.  with the name and quantity of plants you can donate. Thank you!. 

-------------------

Aster

Beardtongue

Beebalm

Black Cohosh

Black-eyed Susans

Black Haw

Blazing Star

Bloodroot

Low bush Blueberry

Cranberry

Daisy Fleabanes

Foamflower

Gentians

Goldenrods

Green Milkweed

Iris

Jacobs Ladder

Joe-Pye-Weed

Lobelia

Ohio Spiderwort

Phlox

Prairie groundsel

Ragworts

Red Columbine

Sneezeweed

Spiderwort

Sunflower

Tickseed

Trillium

Trout Lily

Violet

Virginia Bluebells

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the steps

Gather and/or pick-up donations of pollinating plants from gardens and gardeners. 

Once we reach our goals, we will transport plants to school sites. We will strive to link gardeners to plant-crop-off sites at each of the four CMSD schools in each of the four neighborhoods where habitat creation will occur: Campus District (Campus International HS), Glenville (Willson K-8), Ohio City (Orchard K-8), &  Old Brooklyn (William Rainey Harper K-8). We are also creating a habitat garden at Perry Elementary in the rural Perry Local Schools in Lake County. 

We will utilize social distancing practices to allow teachers, administrators, and potentially students to cultivate 100-200 square foot plots at each school and then mix-in our superior quality soil amendments and finally begin planting the donated plants followed by the sowing of mixed meadow seed from the Ohio Prairie Nursery.  This will likely happen between May 28 and June 5, 2020 and we would be thrilled to have any plant donators assist with planting and sowing seed.

Watering and maintenance of these plants will be completed by a community volunteer or student(s) who will be paid a small stipend, which is being sourced through our four local partner CDC's

If you are able to donate plants from our list, please send an email to John M.  with the name and quantity of plants you can donate. Thank you!

Here is a list of desired plants with additional details including Scientific Names > 

why we're doing it

THE GIST
Students, especially those in urban schools, spend very little time learning in the outdoors.  When they do, it is often via a field trip to a far-away location that requires travel by bus. The time and cost of transport for nature exploration adds up over time, while perpetuating the belief the nature is only found in far-away places.  The goal with Schoolyard Habitats is to bring needed nature to the school by creating wild sites as a place for outdoor learning, observation, and exploration. A habitat can be thought of as a community for animals. As diversity is a key component of building a strong community, biological diversity (biodiversity) is the key component of creating a thriving habitat. 

We have attained another grant to assist teachers in utilizing the Wild Site/Habitat for outdoor learning,  beginning when school resumes in August 2020. The outdoor curriculum will be rooted in observation and inquiry and designed to meet or exceed state standards in Math, Art, Science, and Language Arts through correlation with existing classroom activities. In addition, we have partnerships in place to provide a stipend to students ad/or community members to water the emerging habitats over the summer months. 

If you are able to donate plants from our list, please send an email to John M.  with the name and quantity of plants you can donate. Thank you!

Here is a list of desired plants with additional details including Scientific Names > 

 

BACKGROUND INFO

This Schoolyard Habitat  project is an outgrowth of an annual educators convening, established in November of 2019, called the Great Lake Erie Educators Exchange.  GLEEE is focused on attracting urban and first ring teachers to assist and inspire them to connect with the majestic ecology of the Great Lake Erie bioregion. The inaugural GLEEE took place over two days and two nights in early November at the Cuyahoga Valley Environmental Education Center and was attended by 30 classroom teachers of which 20 were from urban and first ring districts, including 11 from CMSD. Educators were immersed in the outdoors for 15 workshops presented by 25 local conservation and nature education experts during outdoor conditions of wind, rain, and snow. The motto that emerged post confernce was "There is no bad weather only bad clothing choices". While the focus was on outdoor immersion, GLEEE featured some indoor time for shared meals, keynotes + art and socials around a fire. Educators were thrilled to network with educators outside their districts as well as area experts. 

Five teachers who attended GLEEE in November 2019 comprise the group who are creating schoolyard habitats. These teachers represent 4 CMSD schools (Willson, Campus International HS, Orchard STEM, and William Rainey Harper) plus a rural school in Lake County, Perry Elementary. GLEEE will assist these teachers over a period of 12-16 weeks, starting in August 2020, to transition one lesson per week into the outdoors. This minimum threshold is based on recent research from Swansea University in England which reveals that just an hour of outdoor learning per week results in improved feelings of freedom and wellbeing for students and improved job satisfaction for teachers. Further, the one hour per week threshold presents an amount of time for teachers that is relatively easily attainable, especially given that they will be assisted by staff from Great Lake Erie Educators Exchange. 

The Schoolyard Habitats  will provide a platform for outdoor learning that focuses on direct observation as a means to develop and nurture curiosity as an entry point to the scientific activity model for inquiry-based education.  We plan to expand this project to more Cleveland Schools each year, following GLEEE 2020, and we foresee an opportunity for the native pollinators plants that establish in these five school gardens to be used to seed more school gardens in the future. The gift of community keeps on giving!

We greatly appreciate the help of amateur and professional gardeners and gardening orgs to foster a community that nurtures the development and capacity of flora, fauna, and humans to heal our world. 

budget

$500 5 cubic yards of superior soil teeming with beneficial funghi and microorganisms

PROJECT FUNDING NEEDED =    $500
ioby Platform Fee     waived
ioby Donation Processing Fee (3%)    $15
TOTAL TO RAISE =    $515

However, we are after more than money with this project.  What we really need are donations of native flowering perennials!!

Below is a list of flowering perennials native to North America that provide habitat for pollinators either through supplying a food source (nectar) or as hosts that provide food and shelter for larval development AKA reproduction!  This list is not exhaustive.  It is sourced primarily from the Pollinator Partnership's guide for Continental Eastern Broadleaf Forest.  The list is sorted by Common Name. 

Aster

Beardtongue

Beebalm

Black Cohosh

Black-eyed Susans

Black Haw

Blazing Star

Bloodroot

Low bush Blueberry

Cranberry

Daisy Fleabanes

Foamflower

Gentians

Goldenrods

Green Milkweed

Iris

Jacobs Ladder

Joe-Pye-Weed

Lobelia

Ohio Spiderwort

Phlox

Prairie groundsel

Ragworts

Red Columbine

Sneezeweed

Spiderwort

Sunflower

Tickseed

Trillium

Trout Lily

Violet

Virginia Bluebells

 

This list is not exhaustive. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

updates

Sorry, but this project doesn't have any updates yet.

photos

This is where photos will go once we build flickr integration

donors

  • Lee C.
  • Judy and Walter
  • Mark S.
  • *Not* Josh and Debbie ;)
  • Cindy B.
  • Sara Continenza
  • Susan M.
  • Dan M.
  • Juliana T.
  • John M.